I recently conducted a poll of 93 professionals asking them if they would expect to receive Dublin salaries if they were living outside of Dublin and working their jobs mainly from home.

A whopping 83% of the respondents said that they would.

The respondents were made up of professionals working in financial services, fintech, IT, sales and marketing.

Lately when I have been talking to clients and candidates based in various parts of Ireland including Galway, Kerry, Tipperary and Wexford, I have heard a common theme of people who were employed by companies in these regions having been offered jobs by Dublin headquartered companies for substantial increases in their salaries, sometimes double, yet allowing them to remain living in their home county with perhaps one day per week required in Dublin.

This is causing great difficulty for companies who are based in countrywide locations to successfully recruit and also retain employees across a range of sectors, I have seen a particular impact when hiring in IT, compliance & risk, marketing, payments and financial services. Suddenly their ability to pay the market rate appropriate to that part of the country when hiring has vanished.
In a recent conversation with a client, who has locations in both Dublin and the West of Ireland, they informed me that when benchmarking salaries across both locations, the difference was only 7% and shrinking.

Traditionally we have seen a desire for people to be able to work in their jobs remotely or in a hybrid fashion and still maintain the income levels they were used to when they worked full-time in Dublin.

Some companies previously were embracing this, but not from Day 1.

About 12 months ago when COVID meant most people had to work from home, we saw a lot of workers begin to base themselves in various counties outside of Dublin. Used to this situation, many then put it as a prerequisite, that if they were to begin a role with the new company they would be allowed to remain with the current remote or hybrid work set up.

Posted by Stephen Harrington